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BEFORE I COME TO YOU

An exhibition of drawings and prints at the gallery Karas, Zagreb, Croatia.
April 2 - 12, 2015.

Catalog text by Boris Greiner:

Daniil and Danijel communicate with each other through the medium of a time-travelling postal service, one that shows no disturbance of synchronicity even at a distance of a hundred years. In other words, they both seem to have dropped their creations into a mailbox of time that simply holds them, making it impossible to determine the moment of their inception or when, if at all, they might lose their immediacy. Residing in that timeless zone, they talk to each other, but also to other tenants of the house on the edge of time, understanding one another easily despite each using their own language.
Sometimes the fragments of that conversation, expressed in verse or image, start in reality, then move imperceptibly away, but not as if to rid themselves of some burden. Rather, through associations, they project what is concrete into what becomes indeterminate, but in the shape and direction still true to their starting point.
At other times, there is no reality at all, no firm points that could offer us a narrative for guidance, no obvious signs or attributes of written or drawn constructs, only a poem or a painting that appears to have decided all by itself what it was going to be. And the decision seems unequivocal, completely supported by some absurd inner principle, but to the extent that the principle is immediately established as correct, no less a given, its application making perfect sense even when its meaning remains impenetrable - like a mirror that reflects neither what is nor what isn’t, but all the stops in between those destinations, the passage of thoughts through a labyrinth of painted hallways. It isn’t even a journey any longer, because  in the proximity of the images on the walls we are pulled into them, like into a dream of indefinite duration, when a split second becomes eternity, and when, by simply blinking an eye or turning a page, we open a new world.
Articulate unreality, imaginary association, actualization of seemingly inane thoughts, use of uncertain categories, these are all elements of Zezelj’s artistic interpretation of Harms’s poems.  The visualizations, almost identical in expressiveness with their textual references, tend towards an archetype of sorts. It is even possible to see them intertwined, and forming a new, shared archetype. They state and present neither the real nor the unreal, but both, and simultaneously, creating an experience of temporal ambiguity and of a communication made possible by such ambiguity.
A conversation of this kind invalidates historic time and inaugurates instead absolute time, proving that multiple times can exist at once, and that last century’s time can coincide with today’s, so called contemporary period.  These layers of time are seen and inhabited by the painters and writers who refuse to rely on their immediate circumstances or to be “contemporary” according to their peers. It does not mean that they are choosing to be old-fashioned, only that they avoid superficial historicizing of their own time. Reaching into the distance of another time, where all can become a symbol, and everything is a signifier rather than a description, they strive to create what might look alien or even opposed to its moment and the history that surrounds it, but that nevertheless contains and explains that moment and

  • BEFORE I COME TO YOU
     
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